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ONOMATOPOEIA Writing Exercise from Write-Brain Workbook by Bonnie Neubauer
Bonnie Neubauer's Write-Brain Exercises : ONOMATOPOEIA

Write-Brain Exercises to Liberate Your Writing • Day 279

ONOMATOPOEIA

By Bonnie Neubauer

Onomatopoetic words imitate sounds associated with the objects or actions they refer to. here is a long list. Feel free to add more of your own!

Hiss, ping, crunch, pop, sizzle, bang, swish, smash, flutter, clunk, peck, whistle, smack, whack, hush, whir, tiptoe, whoosh, thud, zap, twang, cock-a-doodle-do, squish, stomp, tap, thump, splash, purr, tinkle, gush, kerplunk, slurp, swirl, crash, whirl, clang, mumble, squeak, boom, meow, plop, cuckoo, pow, splat, quack, screech, zoom, tick tock, burp, clip clop, eek, hiccup, moo, oink, buzz

Now, using the first line of Edgar Allen Poe's "The Tell-Tale Heart," write your own story incorporating as many of these words as possible.

"True! Nervous, very, very dreadfully nervous I had been and I am: but why will you say that I am mad?"

TAKE THE NEXT STEP

Another example of a writing practice that can be done anywhere is to simply listen to what's going on.

Write the first thing that comes to mind from these sounds:

Ticking:

Grinding teeth:

Popped balloon:

Rain on metal:

ONOMATOPOEIA Writing Exercise

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ONOMATOPOEIA

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Bonnie NeubauerBonnie Neubauer is the author of Write-Brain Workbook, Take Ten for Writers, and other books and projects that inspire creativity, exploration, and fascination. More »

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