Creativity Portal - Spring into Creativity
  Home  ·   Creativity Interviews  ·   Imagination Prompt Generator  ·   Writing  ·   Arts & Crafts
  What's New » Authors » Prompts » Submit »
Sharing Our Creative Work with Others : Page 2 of 2

Sharing Our Creative Work with Others

continued from page 1

It happens when one of my creative dreams is taking form and shape. This is when I get that feeling of being connected to the Universe, of receiving "divine" inspiration, of really being onto something that feels right for me AND in service to the world at the same time. It's exciting and it's also very scary.

I can take many paths at this point. One path that I sometimes choose is to immediately seek validation, reassurance and support. It's a lifelong habit of not quite trusting myself (and, really, not quite trusting the Universe, which is very silly of me!), and of needing something outside of myself to tell me it's ok (and that I'm ok).

I remember once when I was feeling excited, scared and on the verge of something amazing. I immediately reached for the phone, didn't choose carefully, and opened myself to feedback without requesting the specific type of feedback I was after.

When I was told the project wasn't ready, that I needed to do more research, that I shouldn't rush into it and that "this type of thing" hadn't proven to be successful for others, I was crushed and devastated (exactly what that self-sabotaging part of me wanted).

Luckily I am VERY stubborn and defiant (not always my best qualities, but in this situation they actually worked FOR me), and after a couple of days of licking my wounds I was able to build up my hope and faith in the project again, regardless of what that person said.

That project did see the light, and it is bringing success. It feels right for me AND it's serving the world.

Here are some steps to consider BEFORE reaching out and sharing your creative work and dreams — I'll be keeping these in mind as well!

1. Choose carefully.

Think about people you've shared with in the past and what kind of responses you got. Think about how it felt to have the conversation and how you felt afterwards — did you feel like you couldn't wait to get back to creating something else or did you feel like hanging it up for good? If it's someone you've never shared your creative work before, imagine having the conversation and what response you might get. Choose the person who will build you up, not tear you down.

2. Consider the timing.

The less formed the idea, the more "fragile" it is and the more important it is be supported in a non-judgmental and creativity-enhancing way. Are you truly ready to let someone into the process or would it be better to keep it to yourself for a while longer? Be very honest with yourself about this. Get still and quiet and listen closely for the truth when it comes.

3. What do you want?

Again, think carefully about this and be honest. Do you want support and validation so that you can be re-fueled in your excitement of the project? Do you want a sounding board so that you can hear yourself think (talking to someone else can be a GREAT idea generator)? Or do you want to invite constructive criticism and suggestions for making the work better?

4. Ask for what you want!

The other person can't read your mind and depending on their line of work and their personality type they may instinctively want to give advice, make suggestions or look for possible reasons why something might not work.

Many wonderful creative sparks have been extinguished by conversations that never should have happened. Don't let yours be snuffed out! •

© Linda Dessau, 2005. All rights reserved.

Linda DessauLinda Dessau helps artists enhance their creativity by addressing their unique self-care issues. More »

8/9/05