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Creativity-Portal.com Creative Careers in the Arts Series
Creative Careers : Naomi Rose Interview

Creative Careers in the Arts Interviews

Book Developer & Creativity Coach Naomi Rose

By Molly Anderson-Childers

Naomi RoseWelcome back, readers! It's spring, and ideas are blooming everywhere. This month, I'm working with the aptly-named Naomi Rose to create a garden of delights for our Creativity Portal readers. Rose is a writer and Book Developer with over 30 years in the publications field. She works with writers, frequently first-time book writers, to nurture their book into being.

In the late 1980s, she created a unique approach to writing called "Writing from the Deeper Self." This approach is an antidote to the product orientation of conventional book writing, in which what is on the page is seen as more important than, and essentially disconnected from, the human being who gave it life. Writing from the Deeper Self is based on the conviction that honoring the human being who is doing the writing will bring forth the best in the person, the final manuscript, and the eventual readers of such books, and in this way bring healing and amazing beauty into the world. Amazingly enough, this busy writer and book developer still finds time to consult with writers individually in person in the San Francisco Bay Area. She also works by phone and/or email with her out-of-area, international clientele. She also teaches periodic workshops, classes, and other events on Writing from the Deeper Self, book writing, creativity, and money and the inner life.

Her own writing, primarily focused on healing in its many aspects, currently specializes in the creative process, and money and the inner life. Her articles have appeared in Shaman's Drum, Writer's Connection, The New Holistic Health Handbook, Massage Magazine, The Association for Humanistic Psychology Journal, Intuition Journal, The San Francisco Bay Guardian, Pure Inspiration (Autumn 2008), and numerous other publications. Her books include Starting Your Book, The Portable Blessings Ledger, MotherWealth, The Man Behind the Mask, and The Blessings Ledger.

The Interview

Welcome to Creativity Portal's interview series' May 2008 edition of "Creating a Fun, Fabulous Career in the Arts," Naomi! It is very exciting to work with you here, and share some of your insights in to the creative process.

Naomi wrote: "Before getting into answering your questions, I'd like to comment that they are really creative questions! I can't just give a formulaic, mechanical response. I really have to go inside myself to give reflective, authentic answers. So while it's a bit more of an effort, it's also the kind of gift that a person in the creative life hopes to receive, at heart. And it's also fully resonant with the Writing from the Deeper Self process, itself. I'm really honored to have been asked to offer my guidance, experience, and, hopefully, encouragement to the readers of Creativity Portal.

Q: What was your first job as a young woman? What types of "transitional jobs" did you have before choosing this career?

A: My very first job was at the age of 13, designing and stringing necklaces for a store in Greenwich Village in New York City, where I was born and raised. I was in the thick of adolescent need for independence from my parents, and I thought that if I had my own work and money, that would be a direct road to adulthood. I remember sitting on the floor of my bedroom, on the red rug, with all these beads spread out before me, coming up with designs and stringing beads. I made 50 cents a necklace, back then. It was a great first job; it taught me (though I forgot the message for decades) that creativity could be rewarding financially, as well as artistically.

As for transitional jobs… Ah, there were so many! And many of them had no direct correlation with the work I do now, but were mainly the kinds of jobs that a directionless young person might take while trying to find a place within herself and the world. I was a reluctant salesgirl, a not-so-good secretary, a caseworker in the Welfare Department, a nightshift worker in the Post Office, and more of that ilk. All this, between the ages of 16 and 21.

At 23, I began — unwittingly — the long, often veiled journey that would lead to the work I do today. I was a graduate teaching assistant in an English Department, and then — baffled by the self-referential academic world, and seeking a job in the "real world" — an in-house editor within the same university.

Becoming an editor — a job that I just "fell into" (unless it was karma) — turned out to be my bread-and-butter, my apprenticeship, my mastery, and my shadow for many years. When I moved to California in 1972, I got in on the ground floor of an editorial cooperative, and through that venue proceeded to freelance for more than 25 years. In the process, I learned a great deal about clear writing, the making of books, and authors' sensitivities, as well as the difference between non-writers who author books, and people who are called to write.

In the 1980s, as I was going through a very deep set of personal inner changes, I began exploring nonverbal healing modes for my own healing, including body awareness, inner imagery, sacred music, and the effort to regain the true self. As I slowly began finding my new ground, I realized that working as an editor on the "product" of the book no longer interested me. I wanted to move closer back to the source of how the writing came into being in the first place, and to connect with and encourage the courageous and vulnerable human being in whose heart and mind the writing was coming to life.

Thus my current work, in embryonic form, was born. It's now been over 20 years; and though Writing from the Deeper Self is still evolving, I'm so grateful that it has a well-rooted foundation that supports me, and allows me to support — and be touched by — my clients who so beautifully make themselves available to the creative spirit and their own souls.

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